Building a Learning Portal using Drupal

What is Drupal

A concise definition of Drupal is difficult to come by, as many people use Drupal for many different things. The following definitions provide an incomplete cross-section of how different people use Drupal. Our working definition is the final one in the list.

· Drupal is a database-driven web application written in PHP.

· Drupal is an open-source Content Management System (CMS) freely available under the GPL.

· Drupal is a community-building platform.

· Drupal is a web development framework. You can use Drupal as a platform to build a broad range of web applications.

Our definition: Drupal is a tool that helps people builds interactive websites. It is free to download, install, customize, and use.

What Drupal Can Do For You

Drupal is not a traditional Learning Management System. Drupal started as a community-building platform, and these community-centered roots inform the range of possibilities available within Drupal today.

Drupal provides a wide variety of useful tools for educators. For the instructor, Drupal can serve as a blogging platform, allowing teachers to communicate directly with students, parents, and the larger school and internet community.

Drupal also offers a flexible range of privacy options that allow users to keep some—or all—of the content within a site private. However, a Drupal site can be used for far more than a secure blogging platform. Within a single Drupal site, you can set up social bookmarking, podcasting, video hosting, formal and informal groups, rich user profiles, and other features commonly associated with Social Web Communities. Building your site in Drupal allows you to start with precisely the features you want, and expand as needed.

Drupal Terminology

Drupal, like most software applications, has a specific lexicon. Mastering Drupal jargon is useful for many reasons, not the least of which is that using Drupal-specific terminology can help you search for information more effectively. The glossary in this chapter will give you an overview of commonly used Drupal terms, and what they mean.

This list of terminology will cover our common tasks and features. For a glossary that delves into some of the technical aspects of Drupal, the Glossary page in the Drupal handbook is a useful resource: http://drupal.org/node/937.

Node: A node is a piece of content that has been created on your site. For example, if you create a page, you have created a node.

Content Type or Node Type: On your Drupal site, you will have different types of nodes, or content. The default install comes with two content types, Page and Story. As we progress through this book, we will create a variety of other node types, such as bookmarks, student blogs, audio nodes, and so on. While all types of nodes are content, different node types can have different functions on your site.

Post: A post is a piece of content of any content type. For example, if a user creates a page node, they have created a post.

Core: Core refers to the base install of Drupal. The core install consists of the essential modules and some basic themes for Drupal. Although any person who has an account on drupal.org can suggest a change to the core codebase, most changes to core are thoroughly reviewed by developers within the community, and only a small number of people have the rights to actually make changes to core. As a result, the core codebase is stable and secure. The core codebase can be downloaded from http://drupal.org/project/drupal.

Contributed Modules: These have been written and shared by members of the Drupal community. Unlike core, which represents the work of several hundred contributors, most contributed modules have been written by individuals, or small teams working together. Contributed modules extend the functionality of Drupal, and this book describes how to use various contributed modules effectively. However, you should be cautious when installing a new contributed module. Contributed modules have not been reviewed as thoroughly as core. An overview of all contributed modules is available at http://drupal.org/project/Modules.

Theme: Themes control the look and feel of your site. The core install comes with several base themes, and you can download a range of contributed themes from http://drupal.org/project/themes.

Menu: Menus provide lists of links, and can be used to create an organizational and navigational structure for your site. All menus can be seen and edited at admin/build/menu; additionally, all menus create blocks.

Block: A block displays content within a specific place on the page. All menus create blocks, but you can also embed HTML or PHP code within a block. Blocks can be administered at admin/build/block.

Region: Every theme defines specific regions; blocks can be placed into these different regions using the administrative menu at admin/build/block.

Taxonomy: Taxonomy can be used to organize content within a Drupal site. Drupal permits site administrators to create different taxonomy categories to organize posts. For example, when posting an assignment, an instructor might want to create two taxonomies: one for the type of assignment, and another for the subject of the assignment.

Term: Terms, or tags, are specific items within a taxonomy. For example: a Physics instructor creates two taxonomies to organize assignments. The first is ‘Type of Assignment’ and the second is ‘Subject’. If the instructor assigns his or her students to read an explanation of the Theory of Relativity, this assignment could be tagged with Reading (for Type of Assignment) and Relativity (for Subject).

User: This is the technical term for people using your site.

Role: All site users belong to one or more roles. Site administrators can assign different rights to different roles.

Anonymous user: Any person who visits your site and is not a member of your site is considered an anonymous user. The Anonymous user role allows you to specify how people who are not site members can interact with content and members of your site.

Authenticated user: All site members are authenticated users, and belong to the default authenticated user role. This default role can be used to assign a base level of rights to all site members. Then, other roles can be used to assign more advanced privileges to users.

UID1: This stands for User ID 1, or the first user on a Drupal site. UID1, by design, has full rights over your entire site. As a matter of best practice and security, UID1 should only be used as a back-up administrator account. Often, problems with your configuration will not be visible when logged in as UID1 because UID1 has more rights than other users.

Installing Drupal

Assumptions

To get Drupal up and running, you will need all of the following:

A domain

A web host

FTP access to your web host

OR

A local testing environment

For building sites, either a web host or a local testing environment will meet your needs. A site built on a web-accessible domain can be shared via the internet, whereas sites built on local test machines will need to be moved to a web host before they can be used for your course.

PHP version

Drupal 6 will run on PHP 4.3.5; however, many contributed modules require PHP 5.2. For this reason, PHP 5.2 is recommended. The Drupal 7 release will require PHP 5.2.

MySQL version

Drupal 6 will run on MySQL 4.1 or higher; 5 is recommended. The Drupal 7 release will require MySQL 5.0.

Installing Drupal—The Quick Version

The following steps will get you up and running with your Drupal site. This quickstart version gives an overview of the steps required for most setups. A more detailed version follows immediately after this section.

Once you are familiar with the setup process, installing a Drupal site takes between 5 and 10 minutes.

1. Download the core Drupal codebase from http://drupal.org/project/drupal.

2. Extract the codebase on your local machine.

3. In your extracted codebase, navigate to the sites/default directory. This directory contains one file: default.settings.php. Make a copy of this file, and name the copy settings.php.

4. Using phpMyAdmin, create a database on your server. Write down the name of the database.

5. Using phpMyAdmin, create a user on the database using the following SQL statement: GRANT SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, CREATE, DROP, INDEX, ALTER, ON databasename.* TO ‘username’@’localhost’ IDENTIFIED BY ‘password’;

6. You will have created the databasename in Step 4; write down the username and password values, as you will need them to complete the install.

7. Upload the Drupal codebase to your web folder.

8. Navigate to the URL of your site. Follow the instructions of the Install Wizard. You will need your databasename (created in Step 4), as well as the username and password for your database user (created in Step 5).

Modules and Themes in Drupal

clip_image002

The above diagram shows the folder inside the Drupal software

Drupal-> modules is the place where all the downloaded modules are copied

Drupal -> themes is the place where all the themes (designs for your website) will be copied

After copying the theme and modules to the concern folder, they should be enabled through the admin panel like Administrator -> settings -> modules or administrator -> settings -> Themes

Administering Drupal

The following image shows the administration screen for Drupal. The administrator can able to

  • control the themes for the admin and as well users,
  • control the block placements,
  • enable/disable modules,
  • can set the date/time settings
  • Assigning roles to the users, etc.

The following is the screen to achieve all these points given above.

clip_image004

Assigning Roles

clip_image006

Operation: administer -> User management -> Roles

The roles can be assigned be the administrator. For Education and Elearning, roles can be teacher, student and different permissions can be given to them.

For example, Teacher can be able to create, edit, access notes, but the student can able to only access contents. Such kind of roles can be fixed by the administrator.

In the above diagram, once the role is created, there Is a link called edit permission, the administrator can able to set permissions.

Modules

clip_image008

Operation: administer -> Site builidng -> Modules

In the above diagram, the list of modules which comes along with drupal package is available. Some of the modules are enabled and some are disabled. It is upto the user that the modules can be enabled/disabled.

To Enable, the checkbox to the ticked.

How to add a new module

  • To add any new module, go to the website http://drupal.org/project/Modules
  • For example, a module called as webform is being downloaded to create forms in the webpage, to download go to this link http://drupal.org/project/modules?text=webform
  • A file with an extension of .tar.gz will be downloaded. Which can be extracted through a standard software called as winrar for windows. Linux has the default extract of such files.
  • Copy the folder webform/ which is extracted from the above step and put it into C:/wamp/www/drupal/modules
  • After the folder is copied, refresh the module enable/disable link

clip_image010

  • Enable the module by tick the checkbox

Creating the Content

Content is the main for any eLearning environment. For creating content in drupal, a teacher/educator need not know about the scripting language PHP, as an editor is been developed for placing the content.

clip_image012

Operation: Create Content

In the above diagram, there are four contents like blog entry, page, story and webform

But by default, only two content type page and story will be enabled, but in this picture, the blog entry module and webform modules are enabled, so we can create content for any of the four types

Blog Entry – This content type is very helpful for displaying the lecture notes in a frequent manner, like once a day or week (Even students/learners can also do the job by enabling a role to them)

Page – A page, similar in form to a story, is a simple method for creating and displaying information that rarely changes, such as an "About us" section of a website. By default, a page entry does not allow visitor comments and is not featured on the site’s initial home page.

  • The notes can be pasted or typed and comment section can be enabled so that for any doubts, the students can able to post a query in the comment window and every other student can take a note of it.

Story – A story, similar in form to a page, is ideal for creating and displaying content that informs or engages website visitors. Press releases, site announcements, and informal blog-like entries may all be created with a story entry. By default, a story entry is automatically featured on the site’s initial home page, and provides the ability to post comments.

Webform – Create a new form or questionnaire accessible to users. Submission results and statistics are recorded and accessible to privileged users.

Students Assignment and Project Management

  1. Go to create content and click Webform
  2. A page is opened with the following menus
    1. Menu Link title – “Assignment 1 – B. Tech (CSE)”
    2. Webform Settings – “Assignment 1 – B. Tech (CSE)” and write a short description like date of submission, what file type is permitted, what will be the grade, etc.
    3. Input format – Don’t do anything
    4. Webform access control – If only students are given access to submit their assignments, then enable students alone.
    5. Webform mail Settings: a mail will be delivered each time an assignment is submitted. If the teacher needs that, it can be enabled by typing an email address, else leave it blank
    6. Comment Settings: make it to Read/Write, so that the student can comment on the assignment submission , but the comment section can be disabled also
    7. Authoring information: give the name of the faculty
    8. Captcha: Enable a challenge to avoid automatic submission.
  3. Save the configuration, now there is a screen to add the components, the following elements are needed to submit the assignments
    1. Register Number of the student: Can be populated as dropdown

i. If assignment is given to more than one student, then multiple selection is to be enabled

    1. Assignment Title :

i. Max length of the title can be specified

    1. Upload the assignment

i. File type should be specified like pdf, doc, rtf, docx

ii. File size should be specified: 1000kilobytes

  1. Submit the form and the form is ready for viewing
  2. Once the form is submitted by all the students, all the files from that particular folder is copied and can be sent for evaluation.

Student Project Management System

Same like Assignment Submission, but there is more number of form components needed as given below

  1. The project can be done by a single student to a maximum of 4 students per batch.
    1. So, 4 drop down boxes are needed, the first drop down box being mandatory
    2. Any one student of that batch can login and submit the form
    3. All student particulars like students email ids, phone numbers, etc
  2. Title of the project
  3. Guide information like guide name, email and phone number
  4. Project Venue like Industry, In house or Semester Abroad Programme
    1. A separate textarea for External Guide particulars
  5. Project abstract
    1. Can be uploaded as a separate file or using a text area they can type.
  6. Once the form is submitted by all the students, then the entire form is downloaded as an excel sheet and a project number may be allocated to each project like 2009001, 2009002, etc.
  7. During each project review like 0th review, 1st review, 2nd review and final viva, the relevant presentation and documents will be uploaded by the students. And even the information like how the project will be executed may also be collected.

So this project management is a very good application that can be done using the webform module given to the students/learners.

Not only that the feedback can also be collected from the student by giving a common userid and password to provide their feedback.

TS Pradeepkumar

I teach B.Tech, M.Tech, develop softwares & mobile apps, work with Linux (most of the time), talk/give “hands on” on NS2, MOODLE, WordPress, Linux and open source, play flute, learn new things…. I am working at VIT University (One of the Top universities in India) and I hold a Bachelors (Electrical & Electronics) and Masters in Embedded system Technologies. I love to teach students particularly in open source softwares and tools. I author couple of blogs http://www.pradeepkumar.org, http://www.nsnam.com

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Building a Learning Portal using WordPress

What is a Learning Portal?

A learning portal is a web site that contains links to all different types of learning and training materials for employees at an organization. It may display upcoming classes, online courses, job aids, programs, links to web sites, etc. It may also include search functionality, a rating system, bookmarking ability, and more. The content displayed on the portal may be general to all employees at an organization, or it may be customized for that individual and the role they play. In a perfect world, the learning portal would be able to analyze the person’s department, role, and previous training history. It would then automatically determine learning resources that may be most valuable to that person. It may take a little while, but we’ll get there.

This tutorial will show you how to get a basic learning portal set up. You can add the advanced functionality yourself using either custom programming or by using one of the thousands of free WordPress plugins

What is WordPress?

WordPress is a free content management system that allows you to build and manage your own web site or blog. WordPress is used by millions of people, and it has an amazing support community in case you run into any questions or problems.

WordPress.com Vs WordPress.org

It’s important to know that WordPress.com and WordPress.org are completely different, even though they’re run by the same people:

  • WordPress.com hosts your site for you, which is convenient, but it prevents you from making detailed customizations. WordPress.com sites are publicly hosted.
  • WordPress.org allows you to download the installation files to your computer (or to a server) where you install it yourself. You can then customize the system as much as you want. This tutorial will focus on using WordPress.org.

Installing WAMP (Windows, Apache, MySQL and PHP)

· Download WAMP from the following link. http://www.wampserver.com/en/

· It is an .exe file, simply double click it and give the path as C:/wamp or whatever directory you want,give it.

· Once installation is successful, an icon will be appearing at the bottom right task bar like this clip_image002

· Click the icon, a menu will be opened, click “put online” (this is to enable access to apache to other machines), if your ip address is 192.167.3.4, then any other machine which is connected in your network will give this ip address to use wampserver

· Once you click the icon as specfied in Step 3, you will get the following menu

clip_image004

· localhost –> to display the homepage of the wampserver

· phpMyAdmin –> it is to manage the MySQL through a GUI, you can create databases, tables within databases, update, insert, etc

· www directory is the place where you can put all your web application files. if your entire application is residing in a folder called as “pradeep”, then copy the pradeep/ to the www/ and the path to the pradeep/ is http://localhost/pradeep

· Apache – to configure apache (like change of port address, server path change, etc)

· PHP –> to configure PHP

· MySQL –> to configure and work with MySQL in command mode.

· http://localhost/ will display the following page

clip_image006

Installing WordPress on your Server

Download the source from the http://wordpress.org and extract or unzip it to the folder c:/wamp/www

1. Open the browser and type http://localhost/phpmyadmin and create a database for wordpress. I have created as wordpress.

2. Once the database is created, open a new window and type http://localhost/wordpress

3. First page may show error as give below

clip_image008

4. Click the “create configuration file”.

5. Provide the Databasse information to wordpress, in my case the Database name is wordpress and the username for my database is root and no password and hostname is localhost. (Always give a password to the database) See our video lecture to set a password for the Database)

clip_image010

6. Run the install and once the installation is over, it will ask for the blog title and the email

7. The username and a random password will be provided by the software. Make a note of it and do change the password immediately.

8. The following is the dashboard of the wordpress software which can be accessed using the link http://localhost/wordpress

clip_image012

Use a Template

After you have installed WordPress, you’ll probably want to select a theme to use for your portal. There are thousands of themes available on WordPress.org. Some themes are free, and some cost money.

Tweak the Settings

Poke around with all of the settings in your WordPress site. You’ll probably be surprised to see how many things you can easily configure. I don’t think you can really break anything in there, so feel free to try things out.

Add Learning Content

In WordPress, you can create pages and posts. Pages usually consist of content that is less likely to change on a regular basis. Posts are generally used for content that is regularly updated, for examples news and announcements.

Once you have your site up and running, populate it with your learning content, such as a

· list of upcoming classes,

· online courses,

· job aids,

· programs,

· links to web sites, etc.

You’ll see that you can add media (ex. images and video) to your pages and posts, too. Preview the site frequently to make sure everything is appearing to your liking, and continue to refine you content until you’re happy with it. Be sure to get feedback from colleagues/students, too.

Widgets and Plugins

You can add a great deal of functionality to your site using widgets and plugins.Widgets are known as "sidebar accessories" for your site. Plugins can add almost any functionality you can dream of to your WordPress site. Visit the official plugins page on the WordPress.org site for more info.

That’s it!

The hardest part about setting up WordPress is making sure you have PHP and MySQL installed and ready to go. Other than that, everything else should be straightforward. You’ll be successful if you update your learning portal on a regular basis and continue to get (and respond to) feedback from your users.

Useful links about WordPress

  1. http://www.wordpress.org (source code download)
  2. http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/ (plugin download page)
  3. http://wordpress.org/extend/themes/ (Themes for your wordpress)

If wordpress.org bothering you, then visit http://wordpress.com , create an username and start your blog. The blog can be accessed using http://yourlink.wordpress.com

TS Pradeepkumar

I teach B.Tech, M.Tech, develop softwares & mobile apps, work with Linux (most of the time), talk/give “hands on” on NS2, MOODLE, WordPress, Linux and open source, play flute, learn new things…. I am working at VIT University (One of the Top universities in India) and I hold a Bachelors (Electrical & Electronics) and Masters in Embedded system Technologies. I love to teach students particularly in open source softwares and tools. I author couple of blogs http://www.pradeepkumar.org, http://www.nsnam.com

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IIT, IISc Video Lectures on Youtube

The video lectures of Science and Engineering Courses of IIT, IISc and with various other institutions is available in youtube for all for free access. More than 4700 video lectures are hosted in YouTube.

The entire project is funded by Ministry of Human Resource Development (Government of India).

nptel

The following link you can make use of it

http://www.nptel.iitm.ac.in/ 

http://www.youtube.com/iit#g/p

TS Pradeepkumar

I teach B.Tech, M.Tech, develop softwares & mobile apps, work with Linux (most of the time), talk/give “hands on” on NS2, MOODLE, WordPress, Linux and open source, play flute, learn new things…. I am working at VIT University (One of the Top universities in India) and I hold a Bachelors (Electrical & Electronics) and Masters in Embedded system Technologies. I love to teach students particularly in open source softwares and tools. I author couple of blogs http://www.pradeepkumar.org, http://www.nsnam.com

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Workshop on Elearning tools and Techniques

The workshop on Elearning Tools and Techniques at VIT University, Vellore concluded well and nearly 40 participants have participated.

Some highlights of the workshop

  • The workshop started as per schedule exactly.
  • There was only a 20 minute presentation for the entire day, rest of the times were hands on session
  • The workshop completed as per schedule exactly.
  • The participants feedback collected online (avoided paper).

The agenda for the workshop is

Moodle (Modular Object Oriented dynamic Learning Environment)

  • Moodle for Administrator
  • Moodle for Teacher
  • Quiz Conduction and online examination
  • SCORM Based support in Moodle

Drupal (A Content Management System)

  • Role creation as a teacher and student
  • Student Assignment and Project Management System
  • Students Feedback Collection System

WordPress (Blogging platform)

  • Explained how lecture notes can be delivered to the learners through blogging system
  • Course notes updation at regular intervals.
  • Invites students also as authors

eXe (Authoring Tool)

  • How to create content in eXe
  • Export it as html or SCORM

Some of the snapshots of the workshop

IMG_4607

A Banner infront of the campus

IMG_4621

Prof. Anthoniraj with Moodle Hands on.

IMG_4627

IMG_4624

Prof. Pradeepkumar (thats me) on Drupal Hands on

IMG_4642 

Prof. Balasubramanian on eXe demonstration

Special thanks to Prof. Mythili, Ms. Varuna Mittal, Ms. Nandhini and Ms. Supriya for the support towards the registration process.

For further details, contact us at http://pradeepkumar.org/contact-me-2

TS Pradeepkumar

I teach B.Tech, M.Tech, develop softwares & mobile apps, work with Linux (most of the time), talk/give “hands on” on NS2, MOODLE, WordPress, Linux and open source, play flute, learn new things…. I am working at VIT University (One of the Top universities in India) and I hold a Bachelors (Electrical & Electronics) and Masters in Embedded system Technologies. I love to teach students particularly in open source softwares and tools. I author couple of blogs http://www.pradeepkumar.org, http://www.nsnam.com

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Students Assignment and Project Management using Drupal

Modules Needed

  1. Go to create content and click Webform
  2. A page is opened with the following menus
    1. Menu Link title – “Assignment 1 – B. Tech (CSE)”
    2. Webform Settings – “Assignment 1 – B. Tech (CSE)” and write a short description like date of submission, what file type is permitted, what will be the grade, etc.
    3. Input format – Don’t do anything
    4. Webform access control – If only students are given access to submit their assignments, then enable students alone.
    5. Webform mail Settings: a mail will be delivered each time an assignment is submitted. If the teacher needs that, it can be enabled by typing an email address, else leave it blank
    6. Comment Settings: make it to Read/Write, so that the student can comment on the assignment submission , but the comment section can be disabled also
    7. Authoring information: give the name of the faculty
    8. Captcha: Enable a challenge to avoid automatic submission.
  3. Save the configuration, now there is a screen to add the components, the following elements are needed to submit the assignments
    1. Register Number of the student: Can be populated as dropdown

i. If assignment is given to more than one student, then multiple selection is to be enabled

    1. Assignment Title :

i. Max length of the title can be specified

    1. Upload the assignment

i. File type should be specified like pdf, doc, rtf, docx

ii. File size should be specified: 1000kilobytes

  1. Submit the form and the form is ready for viewing
  2. Once the form is submitted by all the students, all the files from that particular folder is copied and can be sent for evaluation.

assign

Student Project Management System

Same like Assignment Submission, but there is more number of form components needed as given below

  1. The project can be done by a single student to a maximum of 4 students per batch.
    1. So, 4 drop down boxes are needed, the first drop down box being mandatory
    2. Any one student of that batch can login and submit the form
    3. All student particulars like students email ids, phone numbers, etc
  2. Title of the project
  3. Guide information like guide name, email and phone number
  4. Project Venue like Industry, In house or Semester Abroad Programme
    1. A separate textarea for External Guide particulars
  5. Project abstract
    1. Can be uploaded as a separate file or using a text area they can type.
  6. Once the form is submitted by all the students, then the entire form is downloaded as an excel sheet and a project number may be allocated to each project like 2009001, 2009002, etc.
  7. During each project review like 0th review, 1st review, 2nd review and final viva, the relevant presentation and documents will be uploaded by the students. And even the information like how the project will be executed may also be collected.

So this project management is a very good application that can be done using the webform module given to the students/learners.

Not only that the feedback can also be collected from the student by giving a common userid and password to provide their feedback.

TS Pradeepkumar

I teach B.Tech, M.Tech, develop softwares & mobile apps, work with Linux (most of the time), talk/give “hands on” on NS2, MOODLE, WordPress, Linux and open source, play flute, learn new things…. I am working at VIT University (One of the Top universities in India) and I hold a Bachelors (Electrical & Electronics) and Masters in Embedded system Technologies. I love to teach students particularly in open source softwares and tools. I author couple of blogs http://www.pradeepkumar.org, http://www.nsnam.com

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Top 10 Moodle Myths

  1. Once Moodle is stable, it will be put under licence. If it were any good, they’d already be charging for it
  2. Moodle needs a full time, php developer on your staff- or at least a lot of technical support to run it in house
  3. Moodle won’t be compatible with our other systems/software
  4. Moodle just doesn’t have the commercial experience we’re looking for
  5. You can’t just use Moodle out of the box – the basic Moodle install just isn’t that sophisticated
  6. There’s no documentation, training or technical support available – you’re on your own
  7. The Total Cost of Ownership is actually higher for Moodle than it would be with a wholly commercial platform
  8. Moodle is just no good for an institution as large as mine
  9. Moodle is just not designed to cope with my specific group of learners or customers
  10. We have all our stuff on *******, it’s just not worth the hassle of switching to Moodle
    Source: http://docs.moodle.org/en/Top_10_Moodle_Myths

TS Pradeepkumar

I teach B.Tech, M.Tech, develop softwares & mobile apps, work with Linux (most of the time), talk/give “hands on” on NS2, MOODLE, WordPress, Linux and open source, play flute, learn new things…. I am working at VIT University (One of the Top universities in India) and I hold a Bachelors (Electrical & Electronics) and Masters in Embedded system Technologies. I love to teach students particularly in open source softwares and tools. I author couple of blogs http://www.pradeepkumar.org, http://www.nsnam.com

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Installing WordPress on your Server

Download the source from the http://wordpress.org and extract or unzip it to the folder c:/wamp/www

1. Open the browser and type http://localhost/phpmyadmin and create a database for wordpress. I have created as wordpress.

2. Once the database is created, open a new window and type http://localhost/wordpress

3. First page may show error as give below

clip_image002

4. Click the “create configuration file”.

5. Provide the Databasse information to wordpress, in my case the Database name is wordpress and the username for my database is root and no password and hostname is localhost. (Always give a password to the database) See our video lecture to set a password for the Database)

clip_image004

6. Run the install and once the installation is over, it will ask for the blog title and the email

7. The username and a random password will be provided by the software. Make a note of it and do change the password immediately.

8. The following is the dashboard of the wordpress software which can be accessed using the link http://localhost/wordpress

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TS Pradeepkumar

I teach B.Tech, M.Tech, develop softwares & mobile apps, work with Linux (most of the time), talk/give “hands on” on NS2, MOODLE, WordPress, Linux and open source, play flute, learn new things…. I am working at VIT University (One of the Top universities in India) and I hold a Bachelors (Electrical & Electronics) and Masters in Embedded system Technologies. I love to teach students particularly in open source softwares and tools. I author couple of blogs http://www.pradeepkumar.org, http://www.nsnam.com

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Modules in Drupal

Modules

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Operation: administer -> Site builidng -> Modules

In the above diagram, the list of modules which comes along with drupal package is available. Some of the modules are enabled and some are disabled. It is upto the user that the modules can be enabled/disabled.

To Enable, the checkbox to the ticked.

How to add a new module

  • To add any new module, go to the website http://drupal.org/project/Modules
  • For example, a module called as webform is being downloaded to create forms in the webpage, to download go to this link http://drupal.org/project/modules?text=webform
  • A file with an extension of .tar.gz will be downloaded. Which can be extracted through a standard software called as winrar for windows. Linux has the default extract of such files.
  • Copy the folder webform/ which is extracted from the above step and put it into C:/wamp/www/drupal/modules
  • After the folder is copied, refresh the module enable/disable link

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  • Enable the module by tick the checkbox

TS Pradeepkumar

I teach B.Tech, M.Tech, develop softwares & mobile apps, work with Linux (most of the time), talk/give “hands on” on NS2, MOODLE, WordPress, Linux and open source, play flute, learn new things…. I am working at VIT University (One of the Top universities in India) and I hold a Bachelors (Electrical & Electronics) and Masters in Embedded system Technologies. I love to teach students particularly in open source softwares and tools. I author couple of blogs http://www.pradeepkumar.org, http://www.nsnam.com

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Installing Drupal

Assumptions

To get Drupal up and running, you will need all of the following:

A domain

A web host

FTP access to your web host

OR

A local testing environment

For building sites, either a web host or a local testing environment will meet your needs. A site built on a web-accessible domain can be shared via the internet, whereas sites built on local test machines will need to be moved to a web host before they can be used for your course.

PHP version

Drupal 6 will run on PHP 4.3.5; however, many contributed modules require PHP 5.2. For this reason, PHP 5.2 is recommended. The Drupal 7 release will require PHP 5.2.

MySQL version

Drupal 6 will run on MySQL 4.1 or higher; 5 is recommended. The Drupal 7 release will require MySQL 5.0.

Installing Drupal—The Quick Version

The following steps will get you up and running with your Drupal site. This quickstart version gives an overview of the steps required for most setups. A more detailed version follows immediately after this section.

Once you are familiar with the setup process, installing a Drupal site takes between 5 and 10 minutes.

1. Download the core Drupal codebase from http://drupal.org/project/drupal.

2. Extract the codebase on your local machine.

3. In your extracted codebase, navigate to the sites/default directory. This directory contains one file: default.settings.php. Make a copy of this file, and name the copy settings.php.

4. Using phpMyAdmin, create a database on your server. Write down the name of the database.

5. Using phpMyAdmin, create a user on the database using the following SQL statement: GRANT SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, CREATE, DROP, INDEX, ALTER, ON databasename.* TO ‘username’@’localhost’ IDENTIFIED BY ‘password’;

6. You will have created the databasename in Step 4; write down the username and password values, as you will need them to complete the install.

7. Upload the Drupal codebase to your web folder.

8. Navigate to the URL of your site. Follow the instructions of the Install Wizard. You will need your databasename (created in Step 4), as well as the username and password for your database user (created in Step 5).

TS Pradeepkumar

I teach B.Tech, M.Tech, develop softwares & mobile apps, work with Linux (most of the time), talk/give “hands on” on NS2, MOODLE, WordPress, Linux and open source, play flute, learn new things…. I am working at VIT University (One of the Top universities in India) and I hold a Bachelors (Electrical & Electronics) and Masters in Embedded system Technologies. I love to teach students particularly in open source softwares and tools. I author couple of blogs http://www.pradeepkumar.org, http://www.nsnam.com

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Drupal Terminology

Drupal, like most software applications, has a specific lexicon. Mastering Drupal jargon is useful for many reasons, not the least of which is that using Drupal-specific terminology can help you search for information more effectively. The glossary in this chapter will give you an overview of commonly used Drupal terms, and what they mean.

This list of terminology will cover our common tasks and features. For a glossary that delves into some of the technical aspects of Drupal, the Glossary page in the Drupal handbook is a useful resource: http://drupal.org/node/937.

Node: A node is a piece of content that has been created on your site. For example, if you create a page, you have created a node.

Content Type or Node Type: On your Drupal site, you will have different types of nodes, or content. The default install comes with two content types, Page and Story. As we progress through this book, we will create a variety of other node types, such as bookmarks, student blogs, audio nodes, and so on. While all types of nodes are content, different node types can have different functions on your site.

Post: A post is a piece of content of any content type. For example, if a user creates a page node, they have created a post.

Core: Core refers to the base install of Drupal. The core install consists of the essential modules and some basic themes for Drupal. Although any person who has an account on drupal.org can suggest a change to the core codebase, most changes to core are thoroughly reviewed by developers within the community, and only a small number of people have the rights to actually make changes to core. As a result, the core codebase is stable and secure. The core codebase can be downloaded from http://drupal.org/project/drupal.

Contributed Modules: These have been written and shared by members of the Drupal community. Unlike core, which represents the work of several hundred contributors, most contributed modules have been written by individuals, or small teams working together. Contributed modules extend the functionality of Drupal, and this book describes how to use various contributed modules effectively. However, you should be cautious when installing a new contributed module. Contributed modules have not been reviewed as thoroughly as core. An overview of all contributed modules is available at http://drupal.org/project/Modules.

Theme: Themes control the look and feel of your site. The core install comes with several base themes, and you can download a range of contributed themes from http://drupal.org/project/themes.

Menu: Menus provide lists of links, and can be used to create an organizational and navigational structure for your site. All menus can be seen and edited at admin/build/menu; additionally, all menus create blocks.

Block: A block displays content within a specific place on the page. All menus create blocks, but you can also embed HTML or PHP code within a block. Blocks can be administered at admin/build/block.

Region: Every theme defines specific regions; blocks can be placed into these different regions using the administrative menu at admin/build/block.

Taxonomy: Taxonomy can be used to organize content within a Drupal site. Drupal permits site administrators to create different taxonomy categories to organize posts. For example, when posting an assignment, an instructor might want to create two taxonomies: one for the type of assignment, and another for the subject of the assignment.

Term: Terms, or tags, are specific items within a taxonomy. For example: a Physics instructor creates two taxonomies to organize assignments. The first is ‘Type of Assignment’ and the second is ‘Subject’. If the instructor assigns his or her students to read an explanation of the Theory of Relativity, this assignment could be tagged with Reading (for Type of Assignment) and Relativity (for Subject).

User: This is the technical term for people using your site.

Role: All site users belong to one or more roles. Site administrators can assign different rights to different roles.

Anonymous user: Any person who visits your site and is not a member of your site is considered an anonymous user. The Anonymous user role allows you to specify how people who are not site members can interact with content and members of your site.

Authenticated user: All site members are authenticated users, and belong to the default authenticated user role. This default role can be used to assign a base level of rights to all site members. Then, other roles can be used to assign more advanced privileges to users.

UID1: This stands for User ID 1, or the first user on a Drupal site. UID1, by design, has full rights over your entire site. As a matter of best practice and security, UID1 should only be used as a back-up administrator account. Often, problems with your configuration will not be visible when logged in as UID1 because UID1 has more rights than other users.

TS Pradeepkumar

I teach B.Tech, M.Tech, develop softwares & mobile apps, work with Linux (most of the time), talk/give “hands on” on NS2, MOODLE, WordPress, Linux and open source, play flute, learn new things…. I am working at VIT University (One of the Top universities in India) and I hold a Bachelors (Electrical & Electronics) and Masters in Embedded system Technologies. I love to teach students particularly in open source softwares and tools. I author couple of blogs http://www.pradeepkumar.org, http://www.nsnam.com

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